Tag: Secondary school

An Engineering Taster for Teens

One of the great failings of the UK engineering community is its inability to communicate with the young.

In trying to inspire schoolchildren it’s no good just encouraging them to study STEM subjects it’s equally important for them to understand the relevance of what they’re studying to society and a career in the future.

This video created by Newcastle University in Australia is an excellent example of how to connect with teenagers, or in fact the man in the street. It’s short, talks their language, explains simply, and the use of  cartoons make it friendly and approachable. Most importantly there’s is no jargon or corporate speak. Oh and another thing – it was cheap to produce. read more

Attracting Women into Engineering

Robert Lea in The Times 

Screen Shot 2013-10-17 at 14.10.39

BAE  sponsors a think tank to try to puzzle out why few women, and in particular ethnic minority women venture into engineering.

Sadly it’s always the same big companies BAE, JCB, Rolls Royce, Land Rover etc that get quoted whilst the real employment opportunities lie in the other 400,00 + small to medium British engineering companies.

The big problem for the majority of these SMEs is that they do not present a public face which is attractive to  women in general, whatever their ethnic background.  These companies tend to be hardnosed, data driven, and the idea of an image which is employee friendly hasn’t yet arrived. read more

Are we Really Surprised only 400 girls chose Engineering?

65.jpg times

Rosemary Bennett Social Affairs Editor

Efforts to get women into better jobs must begin at primary school, accord­ing to MPs who claim that careers advice is failing to break down persistent work segregation.

While consider­able government energy had gone into addressing the absence of women in the boardroom, little had been done to tackle the dearth of girls taking up apprenticeships in industry and science.

Only 1,200 girls were enrolled in IT apprenticeships last year and just  400 in engineering courses.  Yet there were 58,600 girls learning to be health and social care workers. read more